October 2012 Archives

Blog #38 (Tom Brunansky)

October 31, 2012

This week there is no legal section of the blog.

Now for the Opening Day memory:

This week's memory is from Tom Brunansky, a rifle armed right fielder who was best known for his tenure with the Minnesota Twins. Tom also played for the then California (now Los Angeles) Angels, St. Louis Cardinals, Boston Red Sox (twice) and Milwaukee Brewers. Tom was a consistent middle of the lineup hitter who hit 20 home runs for 8 consecutive years with the Twins and Cardinals. He helped the Twins win a World Series against the Cardinals in 1987, and was then traded to the Cardinals immediately thereafter. Tom played in the big leagues from 1981-1994 and finished his very solid career with 271 lifetime home runs. Here is his Opening Day memory.

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Blog #37 (Sparky Anderson)

October 17, 2012

This week there is no legal section of the blog.

Now for the Opening Day memory:

Sparky Anderson began his Hall of Fame managerial career relatively unknown, and at the very tender age of 36. His playing career had lasted a mere one year (in 1959 with the Philadelphia Phillies) and when he was selected to manage the Cincinnati Reds in 1970, he lacked any major league managerial experience. All he did was become the first manager to win the World Series in both leagues; with the Reds in the National League in 1975 and 1976, and with the Detroit Tigers in the American League in 1984. It was Sparky, despite never himself hitting a major league home run, who spawned the Big Red Machine--the Cincinnati Reds powerhouse dynasty of the 1970's featuring, among others: Johnny Bench, Tony Perez, Pete Rose, Joe Morgan and Davey Concepcion. With the Reds, Sparky won the National League pennants in 1970 and 1972 losing in the World Series, respectively, to the Baltimore Orioles and Oakland A's before winning the ultimate prize in 1975 against the Boston Red Sox and following it up the very next year by sweeping the Yankees.

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Blog #36 (Tug McGraw)

October 3, 2012

This week there is no legal section of the blog.

Now for the Opening Day memory:

During the Mets' 1973 stretch run, which ultimately led to their World Series appearance, either the Daily News or the New York Post ran a series of caricatures. My most vivid recollection of Frank Edwin "Tug" McGraw is the one of him in a Fireman's cap with "You gotta believe!"-- the Mets' catch phrase that he coined during that exciting National League East pennant race where no team finished with a winning record except his Mets--in a cartoon bubble. Although Tug now is probably more well known for being the father of country music superstar Tim, he was a rather big deal in New York from 1969 when the Miracle Mets shocked the baseball world by upsetting the powerful Baltimore Orioles in the World Series, until his trade to the Philadelphia Phillies after the 1974 season. He was also a big deal in Philadelphia from 1975-1984 when he retired. Tug played 10 years with the Mets and 10 years with the Phillies, winning one World Championship with each (1969 with the Mets and 1980 with the Phillies).

Continue Reading Legal Post and Opening Day Memory